TIFR
Department of Chemical Sciences
School of Natural Sciences
  • Imaging Protein Dynamics at Work

    Molecular fluorescence, when observed with a time resolution of a few picoseconds, becomes a powerful tool for revealing the ‘wiggling and jiggling’ which makes the biological world ‘living’. With the state-of-the-art laser technology available today one can observe dynamics of molecules in ultrafast timescales with high sensitivity and selectivity. …..

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  • Rational Design of an Artificial Peroxidase

    We have rationally modified the active site of this thermostable P450 to introduce a residue at the distal heme pocket that could act as an acid-base catalyst and thus enhance the peroxidase activity in the mutant enzyme. This could potentially lead to the creation of a thermally stable artificial peroxidase...

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  • Supersonic Jet Spectroscopy of Weak H-bonds

    Supersonic Jet Spectroscopy of molecular clusters is being used to investigate weak non-covalent interactions. Such forces play important roles in imparting structures to various biopolymers and also enable them to carry out many functions in living organisms under ordinary conditions that keep the biological systems ticking....

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  • Metabolomics for investigating disease process

    Malaria is considered to be one of the major killers in large part of the world. We believe, systems biological approaches may provide us specific insights to the mechanism of disease progression, since this involves the joint biological network of host and the parasite...

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  • Dendritic Fibrous Nanosilica for Catalysis, Energy Harvesting, Carbon Dioxide Mitigation, Drug Delivery, and Sensing

    NanoCat Group has developed next-generation nanocatalysts via the morphological control of nanomaterials, particularly dendritic fibrous nanosilica (DFNS).....

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About the Department

Scientists at the DCS explore the link between living systems and the physical laws that govern nature. They study molecules ranging in size as small as water and as large as a virus. The laws that govern interaction in molecules are best studied in well-defined and isolated small molecules. This information becomes applicable to design novel materials with exotic properties, of value to chemical and solar energy industries and to medical applications. To understand working of biological systems, studies are made on structure, dynamics and function of biological molecules. TIFR is a leader in state-of-the-art experimental techniques such as high field NMR, ultrafast lasers and single molecule methodologies.

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