TIFR
Department of Chemical Sciences
School of Natural Sciences
  • Materials for Nanocatalysis

    We have developed new kind of fibrous silica nanospheres. The material exhibits excellent physical properties, including a high surface area, a fibrous surface morphology, good thermal and mechanical stability. Material was found to be very useful as a support for development of nano-catalysts and sorbents, wherein accessibility of active sites was increased significantly.

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  • Structure/Dynamics of Proteins and Fibrils from Solid State NMR

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solid materials reveals structural and dynamics information. The methods make use of a combination of sample preparation, radiofrequency pulse sequence design, acquisition of multi-dimensional spectra techniques to get geometry information and structural elucidation…..

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  • Peptide-MWCNT Interactions

    A model-free approach has been used to study the association of peptides onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in aqueous solution at ambient pH to understand the molecular basis of interaction of the peptides with MWCNT...

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  • Spin Dynamics: Electron Spin Polarization and Relaxation

    Our research on Spin Dynamics attempts to understand mechanistic details that govern the generation electron spin systems in non-Boltzmann distribution and their evolution to Boltzmann distribution governed by the perturbing electron spin-lattice relaxation processes....

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  • Chemistry driven by delocalized molecular motions

    Chemical reactions are often conceptualized by making and breaking one bond at a time. The idea of localized bond alterations inhibits intuitive thinking about the structure as a whole. The Dasgupta group is focusing on creating a theme using collective motions existing in the molecular structure to drive selective and efficient chemistry...

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About the Department

Scientists at the DCS explore the link between living systems and the physical laws that govern nature. They study molecules ranging in size as small as water and as large as a virus. The laws that govern interaction in molecules are best studied in well-defined and isolated small molecules. This information becomes applicable to design novel materials with exotic properties, of value to chemical and solar energy industries and to medical applications. To understand working of biological systems, studies are made on structure, dynamics and function of biological molecules. TIFR is a leader in state-of-the-art experimental techniques such as high field NMR, ultrafast lasers and single molecule methodologies.

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