TIFR
Department of Chemical Sciences
School of Natural Sciences
  • Deciphering the Catalytic Activity of an Orphan P450 enzyme

    A systematically screened several fatty acids (saturated and monounsaturated) for their potential as substrates for CYP175A1 shows that the wild type enzyme could catalyze the reaction of mono-unsaturated fatty acids but not of saturated fatty acids...

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  • Single-Molecule Protein Mechanics

    Single-molecule techniques are novel approaches to understand the structure-stability-function relationship of proteins, especially force spectroscopy methods in studying mechanically relevant proteins. These techniques are also useful to drive chemical reactions and bond-breakage at single-molecule/bond level to understand the reaction mechanism and get the elusive ‘transition state’ properties....

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  • Chemistry driven by delocalized molecular motions

    Chemical reactions are often conceptualized by making and breaking one bond at a time. The idea of localized bond alterations inhibits intuitive thinking about the structure as a whole. The Dasgupta group is focusing on creating a theme using collective motions existing in the molecular structure to drive selective and efficient chemistry...

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  • Perfecting Imperfection: Defected Nanosilica can transform COto Fuel without any metal and ligands. 

    Using the defect engineering approach, we develop metal-free–ligand-free nanocatalysts, which convert CO2 to methane at the significant rates, scales, and stabilities.....

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  • Imaging Protein Dynamics at Work

    Molecular fluorescence, when observed with a time resolution of a few picoseconds, becomes a powerful tool for revealing the ‘wiggling and jiggling’ which makes the biological world ‘living’. With the state-of-the-art laser technology available today one can observe dynamics of molecules in ultrafast timescales with high sensitivity and selectivity. …..

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About the Department

Scientists at the DCS explore the link between living systems and the physical laws that govern nature. They study molecules ranging in size as small as water and as large as a virus. The laws that govern interaction in molecules are best studied in well-defined and isolated small molecules. This information becomes applicable to design novel materials with exotic properties, of value to chemical and solar energy industries and to medical applications. To understand working of biological systems, studies are made on structure, dynamics and function of biological molecules. TIFR is a leader in state-of-the-art experimental techniques such as high field NMR, ultrafast lasers and single molecule methodologies.

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